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Cafferty Denounces More Money for Wars But None for Poor Families --10/23/2007


1. Cafferty Denounces More Money for Wars But None for Poor Families
CNN's Jack Cafferty used one of his Monday "Cafferty File" segments to denounce the Bush administration for opposing the expansion of the S-CHIP program, and now threatening to veto spending for home energy assistance, while pushing more money for Iraq. An exasperated Cafferty: "No money for kids' health insurance, no money to help poor families pay their heating bills, but President Bush wants $190 billion additional for 2008 for his wars in Iraq and Afghanistan." Cafferty contended "thirty million of the poorest Americans will be left in the cold this winter because a government program that's supposed to help pay their heating bills doesn't have enough money" and yet "the Bush administration wants to cut the program's budget. No heat for the poor people. Starting to sound familiar, isn't it? Remember a couple of weeks ago President Bush went into a closed office, shut the door, no reporters, vetoed a health bill to provide health insurance for kids."

2. Vieira Tougher Than Couric with Plame, Still Frets Over Iran War
Meredith Vieira on Monday's Today show, like Katie Couric on Sunday's 60 Minutes, offered a sympathetic venue to Valerie Plame Wilson, but unlike Couric, her replacement pointed out how the leaker of Plame's name was not a White House operative with a vendetta against Plame's husband and quoted an editorial that contended Plame's outing was her husband's fault. Vieira began the interview by prompting Plame to explain her perception of "four-and-a-half years of character assassination." When Plame said she felt "betrayal," Vieira suggested: "By the President himself?" Vieira also invited Plame to denounce the supposed "beating of the drums" about Iran, "a lot of the rhetoric that you heard leading up to Iraq from the President and from the Vice President," and wondered: "Do you believe what happened in Iraq could possibly happen in Iran? Do you believe we are headed toward war in Iran?"

3. CNN Sticks With Fires, FNC & MSNBC Air Medal of Honor Ceremony
CNN decided to not to break away Monday afternoon from its almost non-stop coverage of the California wildfires as President Bush formally awarded a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan the Medal of Honor, as its competitors Fox News and MSNBC aired the ceremony at the White House live.

4. GMA's Roberts to Laura Bush: Export Generosity, Not Bombs?
America should export generosity and hope instead of bombs and fear. Host Robin Roberts quoted these sentiments from Archbishop Desmond Tutu and columnist Thomas Friedman to Laura Bush on Monday's Good Morning America. Roberts was traveling with the First Lady through the United Arab Emirates and other Middle Eastern countries as part of a tour to increase breast cancer awareness in that region. And while the ABC host mostly stuck to discussing the honorable nature of the trip, she couldn't resist a few pointed barbs. The GMA anchor first cited New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman's suggestion that the U.S. "should export hope instead of fear." Roberts then regurgitated another bumper sticker slogan by mentioning a discussion with Archbishop Desmond Tutu. She recounted: "Desmond Tutu went even farther, saying the generosity of Americans, that's what we should export instead of our bombs." In a follow-up interview with Middle Eastern women who survived breast cancer, Roberts awkwardly asked, "Does it help with Mrs. Bush and the United States coming here?...Or is it seen as, 'Okay, the Americans are, again, trying to force something on us?'"

5. ABC Airs Upbeat Iraq Story on Fallujah's 'Remarkable Turnaround'
A rare upbeat story on Iraq ran Monday night on ABC's World News. Anchor Charles Gibson touted "an extraordinary comeback story" about Fallujah, the city of one of the war's bloodiest and longest battles, but now where reporter Miguel Marquez discovered bustling markets, Marines welcomed by kids and no car bombs or shootings of Marines in several months. Gibson effused about how "we have an extraordinary comeback story tonight from the place where the Marines suffered their worst losses of the war. Fallujah is undergoing a remarkable turnaround. Tribal leaders, local officials and the U.S. Marines have united behind a common cause. Bringing security to a place that had been one of Iraq's most insecure." Viewers saw video of a Marines with kids before Colonel Rich Simcook told Marquez: "This is one of my big measures of effectiveness, where, you know, kids will come up to you, you know, they feel safe to come out and play." Speaking with a Marine Sergeant, Marquez wondered: "When's the last time you were shot at these days?" The Marine replied: "I'd say, end of March." Marquez saw a corollary sign things are going well: "The last car bomb in Fallujah was in May." Marquez concluded with "encouraging signs" from bustling schools to solar street lights.

6. Dr. Tim Johnson Gushes on GMA: Hillary Knows Health Care Best
Hillary Clinton is smart and clearly knows health care better than any other 2008 contender. That's according to ABC's medical expert, Dr. Tim Johnson. On Friday's Good Morning America, the network contributor gushed: "She certainly knows health care better, I think, than any other candidate....I'm very impressed with her knowledge base." Johnson lauded Clinton for "offering a wide range of options" and regurgitated the candidate's use of the word choice in relation to her health care plan. He also failed to ever mention taxes or how the government would pay for universal health coverage.

7. Now Online with 50 Flash Videos: 20th Anniversary NQ
Now Online with 50 Flash Videos: 20th Anniversary NQ. Since the MRC was founded 20 years ago, Notable Quotables has been a vital tool in our mission to document, expose and neutralize the media elite's liberal bias. The special 20th Anniversary Edition contains more than 100 of the most outrageous quotes from our past two decades, many accompanied by audio and video clips. Watch Dan Rather berate Vice President Bush during a live interview; listen to Bryant Gumbel suggest radio hosts like Rush Limbaugh bore responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing; and recall the media's sneering disdain for Ronald Reagan, and their utter admiration for Bill and Hillary Clinton.

8. Don't Miss the MRC's Video Comedy Show Making Fun of Liberals
Have you yet watched the MRC's "NewsBusted" comedy video show posted on our NewsBusters blog? If not, a fresh two-minute edition was posted just hours ago. "NewsBusted" is a new, twice a week, comedy show with jokes about politics, Hollywood and media bias. The idea for the show is really quite simple: Politics is absurd, so is the news. Why not have some laughs from it all? Enjoy the freshest comedy on the Web making fun of liberals and the media.


Cafferty Denounces More Money for Wars
But None for Poor Families

CNN's Jack Cafferty used one of his Monday "Cafferty File" segments to denounce the Bush administration for opposing the expansion of the S-CHIP program, and now threatening to veto spending for home energy assistance, while pushing more money for Iraq. An exasperated Cafferty: "No money for kids' health insurance, no money to help poor families pay their heating bills, but President Bush wants $190 billion additional for 2008 for his wars in Iraq and Afghanistan." Cafferty contended "thirty million of the poorest Americans will be left in the cold this winter because a government program that's supposed to help pay their heating bills doesn't have enough money" and yet "the Bush administration wants to cut the program's budget. No heat for the poor people. Starting to sound familiar, isn't it? Remember a couple of weeks ago President Bush went into a closed office, shut the door, no reporters, vetoed a health bill to provide health insurance for kids."

Cafferty's loaded question in the 7pm EDT hour of The Situation Room: "When it comes to American citizens, you really have to wonder what President Bush's priorities are. Where do the citizens of this country fit into his game plan? Hundred and ninety billion for the wars, cut the heating bill budget, veto the kids' health insurance. The question is the Bush administration doesn't have enough money to help poor families pay for heat this winter, but they want $190 billion for the Iraq war. What's your reaction to that?"

All of the e-mailed replies Cafferty read later in the hour agreed with his disgust toward the administration's priorities, most colorfully illustrated by Bob in California: "It's been clear since the Bush administration kidnaped the White House in 2000, they don't give a damn about ordinary Americans. Let the Katrina victims drop dead, let the 47 million uninsured Americans drop dead, let the poor in unheated homes drop dead, let the children whose government health coverage is being terminated drop dead. What's it matter to them?"

[This item was posted late Monday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

For his numbers on the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), which now stands at $2.16 billion annually, Cafferty cited a Friday Reuters story, "Government money short to help poor pay heating bills," by Tom Doggett. See: news.yahoo.com

Fretting about a supposed lack of adequate LIHEAP funding is an old standby for the media. A couple of examples out of the MRC's archive. From the February 1993 MediaWatch:

Fuel Fraud. On the December 30 [1992] CBS Evening News, John Roberts reported from Boston: "As winter sets in, parents must choose between paying for heat and paying for food." Roberts explained: "Across the country, millions of people rely on the federal government for help with their heating bills, through LIHEAP, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program. But in recent years, that program has been cut 25 percent, while at the same time, the number of people needing assistance has increased." He also interviewed two mothers with hungry children, one of whom complained that she was running out of fuel.

But where is the evidence for the so-called "heat-or-eat syndrome"? Heritage Foundation analyst Carl Horowitz called this a "false choice," citing the 26.3 million Americans who receive food stamps, not to mention Medicaid, AFDC, and housing subsidies. The Department of Health and Human Services, which administers LIHEAP, does not track the number of people needing assistance, and though spending on LIHEAP declined somewhat from 1991 to 1993 (less than the 25 percent Roberts claimed), spending steadily increased for the program from 1988 to 1991. But Roberts only had time for the liberal line: "Those lobbying for maintaining fuel funds say for every cut in the program, there is an added social cost."

That's online at: www.mediaresearch.org

From the January 23, 2003 MRC CyberAlert, "ABC Blames Bush for Impact of 'Proposed' Spending Cut"

The omnipotent President George W. Bush and OMB Director Mitch Daniels. Harking back to a Reagan era-like media focus on the victims of phantom budget cuts, ABC's Ron Claiborne on Wednesday night blamed Bush for forcing a poor elderly woman to have to choose between paying her mortgage and paying for home heating oil so she can "stay warm."

But Claiborne added a twist. He claimed the four million people who get energy assistance subsidies "are receiving less money this year" because of the Bush administration's "proposed cut" in the program. So the cut is only "proposed," yet it has already gone into effect? The Bush people really are improving government efficiency!

Filing a story from Boston for the January 22 World News Tonight, Claiborne noted how the cost of home heating oil has risen 23 percent since last winter. Naturally, he focused on the plight of an old woman who, Claiborne relayed, says she must use money from the mortgage payment to buy oil in order "to stay warm."

Claiborne charged: "The Lees are among four million Americans on federal home energy assistance who are receiving less money this year because of the Bush administration's proposed cut of $300 million in the program. This week the Senate voted to restore the funds, but that money may not reach those who need it for weeks."

I have no idea what the reality is here, but if the "cuts" occurred they are not just "proposed cuts" and if they are just "proposed cuts" then they haven't really occurred. And usually what the media describe as "cuts" really are not and are just reductions in the rate of increase. But even assuming the cuts are real and actually lowered spending in real terms, must the federal government pay for everything? Even at a lower level the recipients are still getting payments.

That's online at: www.mediaresearch.org

And this was hardly the first time Cafferty contrasted domestic spending with money for Iraq. The August 3 CyberAlert reported:

CNN's Jack Cafferty on Thursday exploited the Minneapolis bridge collapse tragedy to take a shot at the Iraq war as he proposed the money "pouring into Iraq" could be better spent "at home," and featured an e-mailer who complained spending on infrastructure is "a drop in the bucket compared to $450 billion wasted in Iraq." Cafferty's question during the 7pm EDT hour of The Situation Room: "In light of the Minnesota bridge collapse, how could the U.S. better spend the $2 billion a week that we're pouring into Iraq here at home?"

For the CyberAlert posting in full: www.mediaresearch.org
The October 4 MRC CyberAlert recounted:

CNN's Jack Cafferty, in his 5pm EDT hour "Cafferty File" segment on Wednesday's The Situation Room, offered a loaded question involving President Bush's veto of a proposed expansion of the SCHIP program: "President Bush has increased the national debt by trillions of dollars. Why would he veto a bill providing health insurance for children?" Before he asked that question, Cafferty detailed how President Bush's veto of SCHIP "was cast very quietly this morning behind closed doors. No fanfare, no news coverage," and the reasons the President listed for his veto. He then added that "this is the same man who will soon go to Congress and ask for another $190 billion to continue that glorious war in Iraq."

For the October 4 CyberAlert item in full: www.mediaresearch.org

The MRC's Brad Wilmouth checked CNN's transcript against the video to provide this rundown of the segments in the 7pm EDT hour of the October 22 Situation Room, with "LEAVING THE POOR IN THE COLD" as the on-screen header:

JACK CAFFERTY: Here's some more great news. Thirty million, 30 million of the poorest Americans will be left in the cold this winter because a government program that's supposed to help pay their heating bills doesn't have enough money. This is compassionate conservatism, boys and girls. Reuters reports that the Low Income Home Energy Assistant Program only has enough money to cover 16 percent of the 38 million households that are eligible. Its budget of about $2 billion is only $300 million more than when the program was created by the Congress 25 years ago. Yet, despite higher energy costs, the Bush administration wants to cut the program's budget. No heat for the poor people. Starting to sound familiar, isn't it? Remember a couple of weeks ago President Bush went into a closed office, shut the door, no reporters, vetoed a health bill to provide health insurance for kids.
No money for kids' health insurance, no money to help poor families pay their heating bills, but President Bush wants $190 billion additional for 2008 for his wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says the President's new request means the cost of the Iraq war is now approaching $650 billion. I wonder if the Democrats will give him the money. They always do, don't they, despite promises to do something about the war before the midterm election. I got an e-mail from a viewer, said that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid is a sheep in sheep's clothing. So here's the question. So here's the question: When it comes to American citizens, you really have to wonder what President Bush's priorities are. Where do the citizens of this country fit into his game plan? Hundred and ninety billion for the wars, cut the heating bill budget, veto the kids' health insurance. The question is the Bush administration doesn't have enough money to help poor families pay for heat this winter, but they want $190 billion for the Iraq war. What's your reaction to that? E-mail CaffertyFile@CNN.com or go to CNN.com/CaffertyFile. That was a pretty funny line, the sheep in sheep's clothing.
BLITZER: Yeah, we've got a lot of creative e-mailers out there, Jack. Thanks very much.

The replies, about 45 minutes later:

BLITZER: You know those stories of those heroes, this guy, Murphy in Afghanistan, you know, it's painful to have to hear that, but these are the guys who are doing the work out there, the heavy lifting.
JACK CAFFERTY: Yeah, and you just wonder what it's all for, don't you, sometimes, what exactly we're accomplishing over there, as these young people like that young man, their lives get cut short in the pursuit of what, I'm not exactly sure.
The question this hour, the Bush administration says it doesn't have enough money to fund a federal program that's supposed to help poor families pay for heat this winter, but they want $190 billion for the war in Iraq, and we asked what your reaction to that was. And we got an earful.
Robert writes from Florida: "It's not the same country I grew up in. We believed you took care of Americans, war or no war. If we had to fight, we bought war bonds to help pay for it. Taxes were raised on those who could afford to pay more. This President doesn't care about regular Americans, and cares too much about a war of choice, his choice. I'm not quite as proud to be an American as I used to be."
Donna writes: "Typical Bush arrogance, truly shows what a fine upstanding Christian he is. I'd write more, but my cold arthritic fingers won't let me."
John in Virginia: "I'm not sure what you're railing about. If the poor people want heat, let them join up and go to Iraq."
Bob in California: "It's been clear since the Bush administration kidnapped the White House in 2000, they don't give a damn about ordinary Americans. Let the Katrina victims drop dead, let the 47 million uninsured Americans drop dead, let the poor in unheated homes drop dead, let the children whose government health coverage is being terminated drop dead. What's it matter to them?"
C.J., Jacksonville, Florida: "My only comment is we Americans are stupid, and Lincoln was wrong when he said you can't fool all the people all the time. Bush has pulled it off pretty well."
Finally, Sandy in Michigan writes: "Jack, and you say it's getting ugly out there. Looks to me like it's already ugly out there. Maybe you can write a sequel to your book. Call it How Much Uglier Can It Get?"
If you didn't see your email here, you can go to CNN.com/CaffertyFile. We post more of them online, along with video clips of the Cafferty File. Wolf?
BLITZER: They're angry out there. There's no doubt about that, Jack. Thanks very much. See you back here tomorrow.

Vieira Tougher Than Couric with Plame,
Still Frets Over Iran War

Meredith Vieira on Monday's Today show, like Katie Couric on Sunday's 60 Minutes, offered a sympathetic venue to Valerie Plame Wilson, but unlike Couric, her replacement pointed out how the leaker of Plame's name was not a White House operative with a vendetta against Plame's husband and quoted an editorial that contended Plame's outing was her husband's fault. Vieira began the interview by prompting Plame to explain her perception of "four-and-a-half years of character assassination." When Plame said she felt "betrayal," Vieira suggested: "By the President himself?" Vieira also invited Plame to denounce the supposed "beating of the drums" about Iran, "a lot of the rhetoric that you heard leading up to Iraq from the President and from the Vice President," and wondered: "Do you believe what happened in Iraq could possibly happen in Iran? Do you believe we are headed toward war in Iran?"

Unlike Couric, Vieira noted how "the first source that Novak used, that revealed that you worked for the CIA was a State Department official, who had no bone to pick with your husband, a lot of people said this isn't really about retaliation from the White House." Vieira even read from a September 1, 2006 Washington Post editorial that held Plame's husband culpable: "This was an editorial, last September: 'It follows that one of the most sensational charges leveled against the Bush White House -- that it orchestrated the leak of Ms. Plame's identity to ruin her career and thus punish Mr. Wilson -- is untrue.' And it goes on to say, 'It now appears the person most responsible for the end of Ms. Plame as a CIA career is Mr. Wilson.'"

[This item was posted Monday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

An October 22 CyberAlert article, "Couric Portrays Plame as Heroic Victim of White House 'Smear,'" recounted:

Katie Couric's Sunday 60 Minutes interview, to promote Valerie Plame's new book, Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House, framed the story just as the media have all along -- Painting Plame as a heroic victim of an orchestrated "smear" with little consideration to who actually gave her name to Bob Novak or the responsibility and motivation of her husband who picked a high-profile political fight with the White House....

Couric went so far as to suggest President Bush's personal involvement in the "smear" effort: "When all is said and done, the top aides to the President and Vice President leaked your name to reporters, do you think President Bush was in on this?" Plame replied: "I don't know about that. But I, like most other Americans, saw President Bush say on TV that he would fire anyone from his administration found to be involved in leaking my name. It turns out the President is not a man of his word."...

Couric did mention Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, but failed to note he was Novak's source, preferring to spin a larger conspiracy and allow Joe Wilson to accuse the Bush team of "Mafia-like" tactics:

COURIC: The special prosecutor, Patrick Fitzgerald, found evidence there were four leakers: Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage, the Vice President's Chief of Staff, Lewis "Scooter" Libby, President Bush's closest confidante, Karl Rove, and White House spokesman Ari Fleischer. All avoided the most serious charges by claiming not to know she was undercover. But Joe Wilson says that's no excuse.

JOE WILSON: It was a mafia-like tactic. And the idea of going after your family, even in Washington, was an outrage. Nobody went after Karl Rove's family. Nobody went after Scooter Libby's family. They went after my family.

The 60 Minutes piece, however, did include a mild challenge to Plame for enjoying some limelight as Couric also noted the "partisan" take of the couple...

For the CyberAlert in full: www.mrc.org

The MRC's Geoffrey Dickens provided a transcript for the PLame coverage on the October 22 Today show:

MEREDITH VIEIRA, 7am tease: And then Valerie Plame Wilson, she's probably the most famous spy in America since she was outed four years ago. She has finally written a book telling her side of her story. And this morning, in her first live interview, she's with us already in our studio, she's gonna talk about her years in the CIA, her experiences since then and why she believes the President of the United States betrayed her.

MATT LAUER, 7:23am: Coming up in our next half-hour the most famous spy in the world. Valerie Plame Wilson, the CIA operative whose cover was blown after her husband questioned the rationale for war in Iraq. Coming up her first live interview.

MEREDITH VIEIRA, 7:30am: Coming up in this half-hour the woman who launched 1000 headlines, Valerie Plame Wilson. Her career as a covert operative for the CIA came to a crashing halt in the summer of 2003, when her name was published in a high-profile newspaper column. Well it set off a political scandal and brought down Vice President Cheney's right hand man. This morning Valerie Plame Wilson tells her side of the story in her first live interview.
LAUER: "That should be fascinating. We'll look forward to that."

...

VIEIRA: First, when Valerie Plame joined the CIA more than 20 years ago she expected danger but the woman who became America's famous spy did not expect to find herself at the center of a political firestorm or exposed by her own government. NBC's John Yang looks back now at the unmasking of the woman the CIA called, "Val P."
[On screen headline: "Spy Games, Who Is Valerie Plame Wilson?"]
JOHN YANG: For years Valerie Plame Wilson shunned the spotlight. The mother of twins told friends and neighbors she was a consultant. But for more than two decades she was a covert, CIA operative, so secret she still can't say she worked for the Agency from November 1985 until January 2006. The twisting path to her public exposure began in early 2003 as President Bush made the case for going to war with Iraq.
GEORGE W. BUSH: The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa.
YANG: After Saddam was toppled her husband, career diplomat Joseph Wilson, wrote in a New York Times op-ed, that when the CIA sent him to Africa to check out that claim in 2002, he concluded it was "highly doubtful." In fact the CIA had deleted the claim from the draft of a previous presidential speech. Her CIA cover was blown a week later when Robert Novak named her in his column and linked her to Wilson's Africa trip.
VALERIE PLAME WILSON: I felt like I had been hit in the gut. I, it was over in an instant and I immediately thought of my family's safety.
YANG: Joseph Wilson said it was White House retaliation orchestrated by Vice President Cheney and adviser Karl Rove. The President denied it and vowed to bring the leaker to justice. In the end, only one person was prosecuted, former Cheney chief-of-staff Scooter Libby was convicted of lying and obstructing justice during the investigation. No one's ever been charged with the leak itself. Now free to tell her story or as much of it as the CIA will allow this former covert operative is now the very public face of a political scandal. For Today, John Yang, NBC News, Washington.

VIEIRA: Valerie Plame Wilson's new memoir is Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House. Ms. Wilson, good morning to you. May I call you Valerie?
VALERIE PLAME WILSON: Yeah, of course. Good morning.
VIEIRA: When I came up to introduce myself and said you finally get to tell your story. You, you said to me, "It's been four-and-a-half years of character assassination." What do you mean?
PLAME: Well, I served my country, proudly, in a career that I loved and I get to write about these things in my book, going, training at the farm and then later, focusing on kind of proliferation issues. Things I thought were really important to our national security. And then, as you talk about in the set-up piece in July 2003 my husband wrote a 1500 word op-ed piece for the New York Times, entitled, "What I Did Not Find In Africa." And he, he refuted the administration's primary claim for going to war with Iraq, which was the nuclear threat.
VIEIRA: And a week later you were outed.
PLAME: That's right and I went from being a very private person to a public persona overnight.
VIEIRA: Immediately there were reports that, everybody in Washington or most folks knew along the, the cocktail party circuit that you worked for the CIA, you were not covert. One Congressman even suggested that you were little more than a glorified secretary. Set the record straight. At the time you, your cover was blown what were you doing for the CIA?
PLAME: At the-, I was covert. And that has been confirmed by the Director of the CIA, General Hayden, the special prosecutor, Patrick Fitzgerald and the judge in the Libby trial. There's no doubt that I was covert. And only a handful of people knew what I was really doing, until July 14th, 2003.
VIEIRA: So why do you believe, I mean if, if you were handling such sensitive material, why would they want to blow your cover?
PLAME: Well I believe that it was political payback. They were furious that he would have the audacity to question their reasoning, their rationale. And then they went after me. And, you know, my book, I think you could call it a cautionary tale of speaking truth to power and the importance of holding your government to account for its words and deeds.
VIEIRA: But when it turned out that the, the first source that Novak used, that revealed that you worked for the CIA was a State Department official, who had no bone to pick with your husband, a lot of people said this isn't really about retaliation from the White House. I want to read to you from the Washington Post. This was an editorial, last September. "It follows that one of the most sensational charges leveled against the Bush White House -- that it orchestrated the leak of Ms. Plame's identity to ruin her career and thus punish Mr. Wilson -- is untrue." And it goes on to say, "It now appears the person most responsible for the end of Ms. Plame as a CIA career is Mr. Wilson."
PLAME: I can tell you it was like reading Pravda, which was the newspaper under the Soviet regime, where that's, you only got to read what the government wanted you to hear. And it was, you know, it, it just made, it felt like falling down the rabbit-hole in Alice In Wonderland, where black is white and white is black. There, in the SSCI report that came out, there was something even in there, that some analysts thought my husband's report, coming back from Niger, where he said, 'You know there's really nothing to this allegation.' That, in fact, it strengthened some analyst view that, in fact, there was some transaction between Niger and Iraq. And that it was just so crazy. And, you know, I think they went after Joe and they went after me as part of the whole payback. Intimidation.
VIEIRA: And afterwards you, you, well you sai-, were worried, you said, that, that your family's lives could be in danger.
PLAME: Absolutely.
VIEIRA: That the lives of those people you dealt with at the CIA could be in danger. It's since been reported that no national security has been jeopardized. Does that square with what you know? What you believe to be the truth? Have lives been put in danger because of you being outed?
PLAME: There was a damage report done. I have not seen it, I don't believe Congress seen it. I do know that, you know, the network of assets that I worked with, is jeopardized. And that's why, what happened, was a real crime of violence against our national security.
VIEIRA: You spent 20 years, giving your life to this country. You're a public servant dealing with matters of high security. Just, on a personal level, how do you feel?
PLAME: Oh it, it was a betrayal. A deep-
VIEIRA: By the President himself?
PLAME: I don't know what he knew or when he knew it but it was clear, as special prosecutor Fitzgerald said, that there was a, it, a conspiracy by a multitude of people within the White House to undermine and discredit Joe Wilson. And I was, just sort of, collateral damage.
VIEIRA: I want to ask you, before we go, about the situation now in Iran. There's been, almost the beating of the drums. A lot of the rhetoric that you heard leading up to Iraq from the President and from the Vice President. I know you've been out of the CIA for a while now but, for a year, but given what you know and you were working on proliferation in Iraq, in Iran, I understand. Do you believe what happened in Iraq could possibly happen in Iran? Do you believe we are headed toward war in Iran?
PLAME: There is no doubt that Iran has intent. And they're, it's malevolent. However, I hope that the American people have learned the lesson to pay close attention to what their leaders are saying and try to educate themselves and get as much information before we rush headlong, again, into a disastrous war based on twisted intelligence.
VIEIRA: But do you believe the administration is capable of doing that in Iran?
PLAME: I do.
VIEIRA: Alright Valerie, thank you so much.
PLAME: Thank you for having me.
VIEIRA: Valerie Plame Wilson. And if you'd like to read an excerpt from Fair Game, you can find it on our Web site, at todayshow.com.

CNN Sticks With Fires, FNC & MSNBC Air
Medal of Honor Ceremony

CNN decided to not to break away Monday afternoon from its almost non-stop coverage of the California wildfires as President Bush formally awarded a Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan the Medal of Honor, as its competitors Fox News and MSNBC aired the ceremony at the White House live.

The Medal of Honor went to Lt. Michael Murphy of Patchogue, New York, who died in the line of duty in 2005 during operations against the Taliban in Afghanistan. Murphy received the first Medal of Honor awarded from Operation Enduring Freedom. President Bush made the decision to give Lt. Murphy the nation's highest military honor on October 11.

[This item, by Matthew Balan, was posted Monday afternoon on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

The ceremony started at 2:23pm Eastern, and both of CNN's rivals carried President Bush's remarks, as well as the presentation of the medal to the deceased SEAL's parents. It wasn't until 2:43pm Eastern, eight minutes after its rival networks concluded its live coverage of the award ceremony, that CNN aired a 3-minute long segment featuring some of President Bush's remarks and a story by CNN Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr on the 2005 battle in which Lt. Murphy was killed.

GMA's Roberts to Laura Bush: Export Generosity, Not Bombs?

America should export generosity and hope instead of bombs and fear. Host Robin Roberts quoted these sentiments from Archbishop Desmond Tutu and columnist Thomas Friedman to Laura Bush on Monday's Good Morning America. Roberts was traveling with the First Lady through the United Arab Emirates and other Middle Eastern countries as part of a tour to increase breast cancer awareness in that region. And while the ABC host mostly stuck to discussing the honorable nature of the trip, she couldn't resist a few pointed barbs.

The GMA anchor first cited New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman's suggestion that the U.S. "should export hope instead of fear." Roberts then regurgitated another bumper sticker slogan by mentioning a discussion with Archbishop Desmond Tutu. She recounted: "Desmond Tutu went even farther, saying the generosity of Americans, that's what we should export instead of our bombs." In a follow-up interview with Middle Eastern women who survived breast cancer, Roberts awkwardly asked, "Does it help with Mrs. Bush and the United States coming here?...Or is it seen as, 'Okay, the Americans are, again, trying to force something on us?'"

[This item, by Scott Whitlock, was posted Monday afternoon on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

Fakhria Lufti, a resident of Abu Dhabi and cancer survivor, seemed slightly baffled by Robert's question. She retorted: "It has nothing to nothing to do with America. You know, okay, she's the First Lady, but it is cancer [sic] everywhere, not just in America, okay?" Roberts is usually somewhat less combatively liberal than some of her other GMA co-hosts, Chris Cuomo, for example. And the anchor, who herself is a cancer survivor, did mostly stick to discussing women's health issues with Laura Bush. So, perhaps these comments were simply an attempt to show token toughness during a White House trip.

A transcript of the October 22 Laura Bush interview and a brief section of a second Roberts interview, follow:

7:12am, MARYSOL CASTRO: Now let's go back to Robin who is traveling with the First lady in Abu Dhabi. Robin.
ABC GRAPHIC: First Lady on a Mission
ROBIN ROBERTS: Marysol, the weather here, 91 degrees and it's the cool part of the year. So keep that in mind. This is the first stop for Mrs. Bush. She will travel to four different Middle Eastern countries over the next six days. And the number of women being diagnosed with breast cancer in this region, absolutely alarming. She has made 68 six trips during her husband's presidency, but in some ways, this may be her most personal and urgent trip yet. It's a mission to save lives.
HALA MODDELMOG (PRESIDENT, SUSAN G. KOMEN FOR THE CURE): We do face, we think, a huge here in the Middle East.
ROBERTS: In Saudi Arabia, 20 percent of all cancer cases are breast cancer. In the UAE, it's nearly ten percent. And 70 percent of breast cancer patients are diagnosed during the advanced stages of the disease, compared to just 30 percent in the west. These countries have resources. The four Mrs. Bush will visit brought in $260 billion last year from oil alone. So why, with all this wealth, is diagnosis coming so late?
DR. OMNIYAT AL HAJRI (PHYSICIAN) It comes with a lot of social stigma. Ladies who are married are really worried about what will the affect of the diagnosis be on their husbands and their families? Many of them will opt not to do the mammogram.
ROBERTS: Many women never learn the necessity of self breast exams and early detection. Important in countries where women get breast cancer ten years earlier, when the disease is more deadly. But many here are working to change attitudes. In Dubai, volunteers on this pink bus give out vital information. Nurses demonstrate self exams. These brave women are breast cancer survivors putting on a fashion show, letting women know breast cancer can be conquered. All efforts the First Lady is here to support while she also focuses on diplomacy. In the waning days of her husband's presidency, she's taken on a more active role. This is her 14th solo trip overseas and she'll meet with the kings of Jordan and Saudi Arabia, using her popularity to try to boost the image of the U.S. here. And Mrs. Bush joins us now. Thank you so much for your time. I know it's a busy day for you."
FIRST LADY LAURA BUSH: Thanks, Robin.
ROBERTS: What do you hope to accomplish on this trip?
BUSH: Well, I think it's very important for people in the Middle East to know that people in the United States care about health and especially women's health because it's still embarrassing and they're fearful and shamed, like we were over 25 years ago.
ROBERTS: And this is a personal issue for you because both your grandmother and mother, both diagnosed.
BUSH: Had breast cancer, that's right. Neither died of breast cancer. My mother is still living and is she's in good health now. But, you know, It is something I worked on for years. In fact, I lived in Dallas when Nancy Brinker started the Komen foundation. And I was one of their early volunteers.
ROBERTS: Are you hoping that leaders here will do more and spend more when it comes to breast cancer research and care?
BUSH: Sure. Absolutely. And we do have the support of leaders here. Because, here, across the Middle East, there is a high rate of breast cancer. Younger women get breast cancer here than they do in many other parts of the world.
ROBERTS: Is this a way of broadening the discussion here in this region of the world where women's rights, they're not empowered as women are all across the world. I mean, we're going to Saudi Arabia tomorrow, where women still cannot drive. So, is there a bigger hope here in pushing forward for women's rights?
BUSH: Well, I think this is a very good way for American women or the American people in general to reach out to women across the Middle East, no matter what their circumstances are. All of us face the same health challenges.
ROBERTS: I recently talked with Thomas Friedman of the Washington Post and also Archbishop Tutu. And Thomas Friedman said, you know, we should export hope instead of fear. Desmond Tutu went even farther, saying the generosity of Americans, that's what we should export, instead of our bombs. So, is this a way of reaching across to the world and saying, especially in this region of the world-
BUSH: Absolutely. In these countries, the United Arab Emirates is a very strong friend and ally to the United States, as is Kuwait and, you know, the other-- Jordan and Saudi Arabia, the other countries that I'll be visiting, are our allies. But you're right and Thomas Friedman's right and Desmond Tutu is right. And in fact, we do export our generosity. We just need to get the word out about it.
ROBERTS: You're very outspoken recently about the country of Myanmar, about the repression there and even going as far as talking about possible additional sanctions. What led you to speak out?
BUSH: This summer when we watched the demonstrators in Burma march, including many Buddhist monks and then saw the very extreme and brutal repression of these peaceful demonstrators. I felt an obligation to speak out.
ROBERTS: Your husband has had some stern warnings toward Iran, going as far as to say a nuclear Iran could lead to World War III and in the last 24 hours, Vice President Cheney has echoed some of those sentiments. Are you concerned about the growing tension?
BUSH: Certainly. Absolutely I'm concerned about it. But I do also know that the United States wants to work with diplomatic -- keep diplomacy working in Iran. And we have many friends and allies here in the Middle East that we also hope will continue to work with the Iran to make sure that Iran does not develop nuclear weapons. This is a country that has said they want Israel wiped off the face of the Earth. I mean, these are threats that the world needs to take seriously. And no one wants to see any sort of nuclear proliferation anywhere here in the Middle East.
ROBERTS: Are you concerned that it could lead to a new war?
BUSH: No, I'm not. I mean, I'm not worried about it. But I also do know we need to continue to work as hard as we can with our friends and allies here and around the world to persuade Iran not to develop nuclear weapons.
ROBERTS: Well, Mrs. Bush, as I said, I know it's a very busy day for you. And I appreciate you spending time with me.
BUSH: Thank you so much Robin, and thank you for coming on this trip. You also serve as a great example to people here and I appreciate it.
ROBERTS: I wouldn't miss it. I wouldn't miss it. Thank you. [End of interview] And I'm fortunate that I was well enough to travel during my treatment for breast cancer to make this trip. It was easy getting the doctor's permission. Diane, as you know, getting my mom's permission, a lot harder. We'll have more from the Middle East coming up.
DIANE SAWYER: I'm surprised you didn't ask me to make that call.

8:20AM, ROBERTS: Does it help with Mrs. Bush and the United States coming here? Is it seen in a positive light? Or is it seen as, 'Okay, the Americans are, again, trying to force something on us?'
FAKHRIA LUFTI (BREAST CANCER SURVIVOR): It has nothing to nothing to do with America. You know, okay, she's the First Lady, but it is cancer [sic] everywhere, not just in America, okay? It's all over the world. It doesn't know the nationality.
DR. HOURIYA KAZIM (BREAST CANCER SURGEON): There's lots of awareness now, but what we need is education. The awareness is there. Pink ribbons are everywhere, but, you know, we tell people, 'Don't let those pink ribbons fool you.' It's still a scary thing. You know, when you hear the words breast cancer people are still afraid. And the fear tells me that they really don't have the knowledge and they're, you know, still ignorant about the disease.

ABC Airs Upbeat Iraq Story on Fallujah's
'Remarkable Turnaround'

A rare upbeat story on Iraq ran Monday night on ABC's World News. Anchor Charles Gibson touted "an extraordinary comeback story" about Fallujah, the city of one of the war's bloodiest and longest battles, but now where reporter Miguel Marquez discovered bustling markets, Marines welcomed by kids and no car bombs or shootings of Marines in several months. Gibson effused about how "we have an extraordinary comeback story tonight from the place where the Marines suffered their worst losses of the war. Fallujah is undergoing a remarkable turnaround. Tribal leaders, local officials and the U.S. Marines have united behind a common cause. Bringing security to a place that had been one of Iraq's most insecure."

Over matching video, Marquez described how "the markets bustle. Traffic chokes the streets. Marines, once despised here, are now a welcome sight." Viewers saw video of a Marines with kids before Colonel Rich Simcook told Marquez: "This is one of my big measures of effectiveness, where, you know, kids will come up to you, you know, they feel safe to come out and play." Speaking with a Marine Sergeant, Marquez wondered: "When's the last time you were shot at these days?" The Marine replied: "I'd say, end of March." Marquez saw a corollary sign things are going well: "The last car bomb in Fallujah was in May." Though Marquez added some caveats about high unemployment and the lack of weapons for the Iraqi police, he concluded on the bright side: "There are encouraging signs. Schools just opened, and enrollment is at its highest since before the war. Construction, from huge infrastructure projects to fixing sidewalks, is everywhere. Fallujah even sports solar street lights..."

[This item was posted Monday night on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

ABCNews.com, in the World News section, has video of a shortened (about one minute) version of the Marquez story. Direct link to the abbreviated video: abcnews.go.com

The MRC's Brad Wilmouth corrected the closed-captioning against the video to provide this transcript of the October 22 World News story:

CHARLES GIBSON: In Iraq itself, we have an extraordinary comeback story tonight from the place where the Marines suffered their worst losses of the war. Fallujah is undergoing a remarkable turnaround. Tribal leaders, local officials and the U.S. Marines have united behind a common cause. Bringing security to a place that had been one of Iraq's most insecure. ABC's Miguel Marquez reports tonight from Fallujah.

MIGUEL MARQUEZ: The markets bustle. Traffic chokes the streets. Marines, once despised here, are now a welcome sight.
COLONEL RICH SIMCOCK, U.S. Marines: This is one of my big measures of effectiveness, where, you know, kids will come up to you, you know, they feel safe to come out and play.
MARQUEZ: Colonel Rich Simcock has been the main battlefield commander in Fallujah for the past ten months.
SIMCOCK: Every day, it just gets a little better.
MARQUEZ: In that time, he has witnessed a sea change.
SIMCOCK: For someone that doesn't know Fallujah, you know, you'd look around like, well, this is kind of a dirty city. We're walking almost in the center of the city. Numerous battles have been fought in this area, and we're walking around, no one shooting at us.
MARQUEZ: Battles that left the city devastated.
SERGEANT CHUCK BURTON, U.S. Marines: And there was times, we were rolling through the city, you get there through sundown, you were guaranteed to either get popped on or get shot at.
MARQUEZ: And when's the last time you were shot at these days?
BURTON: I'd say, end of March.
MARQUEZ: The last car bomb in Fallujah was in May. Soon after, tribal leaders, fed up with al-Qaeda's violent ways and strict Islamic codes, looked to the Marines for help. This is something that was unthinkable just a few months ago -- shops that are filled with produce, people on the streets, but Fallujah still has a very, very long way to go. As security has improved, tens of thousands of people have returned. The downside, unemployment has rocketed to 70 percent, a problem Fallujah's young mayor is trying to solve now. "Terrorists give money to out-of-work civilians," says the mayor. "We are under pressure to create jobs quickly so young people won't be tempted to fight." So they are expanding the police force rapidly. "We're getting lots of volunteers," says the police chief. "When we ask for 50 more officers, we see 200 people step forward." The Iraqi police, not the Marines, are now in charge of security here. But many officers don't have proper weapons, training, or even uniforms. Does this stop bullets?
UNIDENTIFIED MAN: No, no.
MARQUEZ: There are encouraging signs. Schools just opened, and enrollment is at its highest since before the war. Construction, from huge infrastructure projects to fixing sidewalks, is everywhere. Fallujah even sports solar street lights. It is a city in recovery, with a lot of hard work ahead. Miguel Marquez, ABC News, Fallujah.

Dr. Tim Johnson Gushes on GMA: Hillary
Knows Health Care Best

Hillary Clinton is smart and clearly knows health care better than any other 2008 contender. That's according to ABC's medical expert, Dr. Tim Johnson. On Friday's Good Morning America, the network contributor gushed: "She certainly knows health care better, I think, than any other candidate....I'm very impressed with her knowledge base." Johnson lauded Clinton for "offering a wide range of options" and regurgitated the candidate's use of the word choice in relation to her health care plan. He also failed to ever mention taxes or how the government would pay for universal health coverage.

Johnson may be a respected medical expert, but he's clearly a Clinton cheerleader. He has a long history of backing Bill and Hillary, as well as other liberal politicians. On Friday, the doctor casually asked Mrs. Clinton: "You have said that providing health insurance for everyone is a moral issue. Do you think the Republicans who are against it are immoral?" The ABC contributor also praised the 2008 contender for speaking "eloquently" on issues related to health care and, after noting that America has only had male presidents, sycophantically wondered, "Do you think being a female president would make any difference in leading the health care reform debate?"

[This item, by Scott Whitlock, was posted Friday afternoon on the MRC's blog, NewsBusters.org: newsbusters.org ]

At one point in the interview, Johnson asked about the fact that the number of women getting mammograms has been dropping. He quizzed, "How can we change that, short of an edict?" Now, one could see that as a challenge of Clinton's yearning for a nanny state. But the GMA correspondent has a long history of touting Clinton government-run health care plans. An October 2003 CyberAlert noted some of his more effusive comments from the early '90s:

# "So at least from the physicians represented here, you get a 100 percent vote, including mine, for universal coverage." -- ABC reporter Dr. Tim Johnson to Hillary Clinton on Good Morning America, July 19, 1994.

# "I say the Clintons are almost heroes in my mind for finally facing up to the terrible problems we have with our current health care system and bringing it to the attention of the public....Most people, I think, will be better off." -- ABC Medical Editor Dr. Tim Johnson, September 24, 1993 20/20.

For more, see the October 21, 2003 CyberAlert: www.mediaresearch.org

The above comments make Johnson's statements on Friday, in which he tried to mildly criticize the Clintons, seem somewhat disingenuous. He told co-host Robin Roberts: "Back in the '90s, they met behind closed doors in the White House....And they were very rigid in their plan. They had a very detailed, bureaucratic plan that was difficult, difficult for people to understand."

Finally, perhaps the biggest problem with Tim Johnson interviewing Hillary Clinton is the fact that it was touted as a hard hitting look at her health care plan. Co-host Chris Cuomo teased the segment by announcing: "People are wondering, how would your health care change if Hillary Clinton were elected President?" And yet, Johnson never once asked about taxes or how the candidate would pay for her proposals.

A transcript of the segment, which aired at 7:42am on October 19:

7:31am tease, CHRIS CUOMO: All right, so here's the question: We're wondering now -- The biggest, one of the biggest domestic issues of the election is health care, right? People are wondering, how would your health care change if Hillary Clinton were elected president? Well, you're going to get your answers this morning 'cause Hillary Clinton talks to our Dr. Tim Johnson about the key issue of breast cancer and what she would do to make sure all women have access to mammograms.

7:42am, ROBIN ROBERTS: And turning now to health care and Hillary Clinton. Over the years, voters have heard a lot about this issue from the former First Lady, now Senator Clinton. And on Thursday, our medical editor, Dr. Tim Johnson, had a chance to sit down with her to talk about health care.
Dr. TIM JOHNSON: We've had an unbroken string of male presidents. Do you think being a female president would make any difference in leading the health care reform debate?
SENATOR HILLARY CLINTON: Well, I hope to find out, you know? I'm very excited at the prospect of being the first woman president but I'm not running because I'm a woman.
JOHNSON: I know that.
CLINTON: I'm running because I think I'm the best qualified and experienced person to do this.
JOHNSON: Let's talk about one issue very much on the country's mind this month, breast cancer.
CLINTON: Right.
JOHNSON: As you know, the rates for mammography are dropping. The number of radiologists going into mammography is dropping. The number of places that do mammography is dropping. How can we change that, short of an edict?
CLINTON: Well, Tim, I'm deeply concerned about this. And I've of, course, been following Robin's experience and I wish her well. She's been absolutely magnificent in how she's communicated all of this.
JOHNSON: I agree.
CLINTON: But we need to look hard. Because actually there's increasing evidence that mammography works. People can get their breast cancer diagnosed early, which is a big help in terms of treating it and surviving it. And I think we've got to have an outreach again. We need more public health outreach.
JOHNSON: Let's turn to general health care for a minute. You have talked eloquently about the need for an electronic record keeping system that will help bring some systemic ideas to the health care system that we don't have now. I remember sitting in Senator Frist's office a couple years ago when you and Newt Gingrich were also there and everybody was so excited that this was going to happen, right around the corner. Still hasn't happened.
CLINTON: I know.
JOHNSON: If you can't get that, that everybody agrees on to happen, how are we going to make all the other changes in health care that are so controversial?
CLINTON: Well, Tim, I remember that dinner we had in Senator Frist's office. And it was a meeting of some strange bedfellows, but we were all from our different experiences committed to the electronic medical record. We were able to get that legislation passed in the Senate and it died in the House. It died, in part, because after evidencing some interest in it, the White House retreated. It wasn't a priority. And in the absence of presidential leadership to break logjams and try to convince people to do something which, you know, is not on the headlines but is a long-term investment, that was a problem. It would have cost some money for us to get this architecture set up and the Bush administration didn't want to spend the money because by then the Iraq War was taking off and the costs were escalating. We have gone back. We have a bipartisan piece of legislation in the Senate again. We're going to push it again.
JOHNSON: You have said that providing health insurance for everyone is a moral issue. Do you think the Republicans who are against it are immoral?
CLINTON: No. I think, though, that they are not looking at the facts. Because they, first of all, don't see apparently what I see, which is that we have a lot of hard-working Americans who just can't afford it. That's what this children's health insurance program fight has been all about. You know, some Republicans say, 'Well, you know, you're making $48,000, $50,000 a year, you don't have insurance even though you work full time. Your child gets in a car accident, sell your house.' You know? That's just a different approach. I don't think in America you should have to sell your house to get your child health insurance when you're a working person. So it's a difference in how we see our country, what we think of the bring yard priorities and I think we're going to have a big debate about it in this presidential campaign.
JOHNSON: Thank you very much for your time.
ROBERTS: I know it's a debate that you're welcoming with all the candidates, Tim. So, what's different now with her plan now, as opposed to what she proposed back in the '90s?
JOHNSON: Well, first of all, the way she's doing it. Back in the '90s, they met behind closed doors in the White House. They didn't consult Congress. There was a strategic mistake. And they were very rigid in their plan. They had a very detailed, bureaucratic plan that was difficult, difficult for people to understand. Now she uses the word choice all the time. She basically says if you like what you got, keep it. But if you don't, we're going to offer you some public alternatives like a Medicaid-like plan or federal employee-like plan. And so, she's offering a wide range of options. And I think that's going to be the key to whatever success she has. She certainly knows health care better, I think, than any other candidate. She's learned by hard experience and she studies it. I'm very impressed with her knowledge base.
ROBERTS: Well, thanks for bringing to us. We appreciate that, Tim. Have a good weekend.

Now Online with 50 Flash Videos: 20th
Anniversary NQ

Now Online with 50 Flash Videos: 20th Anniversary NQ. Since the MRC was founded 20 years ago, Notable Quotables has been a vital tool in our mission to document, expose and neutralize the media elite's liberal bias. The special 20th Anniversary Edition contains more than 100 of the most outrageous quotes from our past two decades, many accompanied by audio and video clips. Watch Dan Rather berate Vice President Bush during a live interview; listen to Bryant Gumbel suggest radio hosts like Rush Limbaugh bore responsibility for the Oklahoma City bombing; and recall the media's sneering disdain for Ronald Reagan, and their utter admiration for Bill and Hillary Clinton.

To read the quotes and watch the videos: www.mrc.org

Several people at the MRC were involved in this project and deserve credit: Rich Noyes, who oversaw the project, slogged through 20 years of "Best of" issues to compile the quotes and he produced the printed issue; our DVR team of Michelle Humphrey, Kristine Lawrence and Melissa Lopez who found the videos in our archive, edited them, made still shots and rendered the flv and wmv video as well as mp3 audio; and Eric Pairel of our IT department, who created the Web page and posted the Flash video clips.

For the 8-page PDF which matches the hard copy, but without any pictures or videos: www.mrc.org

# CLICK AND PLAY FLASH VIDEO, Plus other options: We're very excited that this production marks the MRC's first time to post "click and play" Flash video. So if you have Flash functional in your browser, as most do who use Firefox or Internet Explorer, just click on a screen shot and the video will play.

If you want to see a larger version, or prefer to download, you'll see Windows Media icons to allow you to download the wmv. Same goes for the MP3 audio clips for radio hosts or producers who wish the play the clips of their show.
As noted in a Monday CyberAlert Special announcing the posting of the anniversary issue, Rich Noyes is posting, on the MRC's NewsBusters blog, a daily installment of quotes from the anniversary issue. Here's the one to be posted Tuesday:

Yesterday, I wrote about the liberal media's softness when it came to totalitarian communism. Today's installment: The liberal media vs. Ronald Reagan and the GOP. TV reporters regularly condemned Reagan for his supposedly ruinous conservative policies, but it's still astonishing to hear then-ABC reporter Richard Threlkeld castigate the Gipper on his last day as President, January 20, 1989.

The background: On January 16, 1989, an Hispanic Miami police officer shot and killed a young black man as he fled from police on a motorcycle. The incident touched off three nights of rioting that left one person dead and perhaps $1 million in property damage, according to a Washington Post report from the time.

For the Inauguration Day edition of ABC's World News Tonight, Threlkeld decided to make the riots a symptom of what he claimed was Reagan's "neglect" of inner cities:

"After eight years of what many saw as the Reagan Administration's benign neglect of the poor and studied indifference to civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week in Overtown [rioting in a section of Miami] seemed to think the best thing about George Bush is that he is not Ronald Reagan," Thelkeld intoned. "There is an Overtown in every big city in America. Pockets of misery made even meaner and more desperate the past eight years."

Five and a half years later, when voters finally ended 40 years of Democratic control of Congress, then-ABC anchor Peter Jennings reflected the same attitude in a November 14, 1994 radio commentary smugly chastising "angry" voters:

"Some thoughts on those angry voters. Ask parents of any two- year-old and they can tell you about those temper tantrums: the stomping feet, the rolling eyes, the screaming. It's clear that the anger controls the child and not the other way around. It's the job of the parent to teach the child to control the anger and channel it in a positive way. Imagine a nation full of uncontrolled two-year-old rage. The voters had a temper tantrum last week...Parenting and governing don't have to be dirty words: the nation can't be run by an angry two-year-old."

Some of the other quotes that show the media's disdain for Reagan and conservatism:

# "The amazing thing is most people seem content to believe that almost everybody had a good time in the '80s , a real shot at the dream. But the fact is, they didn't. Did we wear blinders? Did we think the '80s left behind just the homeless? The fact is that almost nine in ten Americans actually saw their lifestyle decline." -- NBC reporter Keith Morrison, February 7, 1992 Nightly News. Census Bureau data shows median family income increased in all income classes from 1981 to 1989.

# "In the plague years of the 1980s -- that low decade of denial, indifference, hostility, opportunism and idiocy -- government fiddled and medicine diddled, and the media were silent or hysterical. A gerontocratic Ronald Reagan took this [AIDS] plague less seriously than Gerald Ford had taken swine flu. After all, he didn't need the ghettos and he didn't want the gays." -- CBS's John Leonard on Sunday Morning, September 5, 1993.

# "The new Republican majority in Congress took a big step today on its legislative agenda to demolish or damage government aid programs, many of them designed to help children and the poor." -- Dan Rather, March 16, 1995 CBS Evening News.

# "When NBC Nightly News continues: In Washington, if they cut food stamps, who doesn't eat?" -- Tom Brokaw, March 22, 1995.

# "Next week on ABC's World News Tonight, a series of reports about our environment which will tell you precisely what the new Congress has in mind: the most frontal assault on the environment in 25 years. Is this what the country wants?" -- Peter Jennings in an ABC promo during the July 9, 1995 This Week with David Brinkley.

# "In light of the new welfare reform bill, do you think the children need more prayers than ever before?" -- Bryant Gumbel to Children's Defense Fund leader Marian Wright Edelman, September 23, 1996 Today.

# CBS's Morley Safer: "You talk about a vision, and it's some kind of abstract, vague idea. Did his [Ronald Reagan's] vision include extraordinary deficits? Did his vision include cutting of the budgets for education and a back of the hand in terms of public education?" Larry King: "History will not be kind to him?" Safer: "No, I don't think history particularly will be kind....I don't think history has any reason to be kind to him." -- CNN's Larry King Live, June 14, 2004.

To read the full issue, and watch any of the 50 video clips that accompany the issue: www.mrc.org

Don't Miss the MRC's Video Comedy Show
Making Fun of Liberals

Have you yet watched the MRC's "NewsBusted" comedy video show posted on our NewsBusters blog? If not, a fresh two-minute edition was posted just hours ago. "NewsBusted" is a new, twice a week, comedy show with jokes about politics, Hollywood and media bias. The idea for the show is really quite simple: Politics is absurd, so is the news. Why not have some laughs from it all? Enjoy the freshest comedy on the Web making fun of liberals and the media.

You'll find the latest edition at the top of NewsBusters: www.newsbusters.org

For the archive of ones you've missed, as posted on YouTube in click and play Flash format: www.youtube.com

There are 13 episodes online to enjoy.

Check out #109 for some jokes about the left-wing media attack on Rush Limbaugh. Direct address: www.youtube.com

-- Brent Baker