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NBC's Gregory: Obama to Claim 'Warlord-ism' in GOP, O'Donnell's 'Extremist' Views a 'Real Problem' 'Almost Anywhere'

It's one thing to acknowledge that most voters in a liberal-leaning state like Delaware may be reluctant to vote for a solid conservative, but, as he appeared on Sunday's Today show on NBC, Meet the Press host David Gregory claimed that Delaware GOP Senate nominee Christine O'Donnell's "extremist statements and some views" would not only be a "real problem" in Delaware, but "it would be the case almost anywhere." And, rather than noting the liberal lean of Delaware, which has not voted Republican in a presidential election since 1988, Gregory described the state as "more moderate." Gregory: "Christine O'Donnell also represents a real problem for the Republican party. I mean, her track record of statements, extremist statements and some views on issues are going to be a real problem - not just in a state like Delaware that's more moderate, but it would be the case almost anywhere."

And as Gregory described the likely strategy of President Obama to paint Republicans as extreme, the NBC host seemed to channel MSNBC's Chris Matthews as he suggested that Obama might claim that "warlord-ism" is "going on within the party, extremism within the party." After noting that the Tea Party movement indicates Republicans are energized to vote in November, Gregory continued:

Beyond that, you'll see the President and his allies saying, "Look, this is a Republican party going through a revolution. They don't know which side is up. There's a kind of warlord-ism going on within the party, extremism within the party. This is not a party that you want to have leading the country." That will be the argument that you hear more and more, and that you're already hearing the President make.

Below is a transcript of the relevant portion of the Sunday, September Today show on NBC:

LESTER HOLT: Another woman to watch on the Republican side, virtual underdog Christine O'Donnell, pulled off the win in Delaware this past week. Same in New Hampshire, Tea Party candidate. What do we make of all this? And does it propel this Tea Party belief to a new level?

DAVID GREGORY: I think it does because this was seen as even more unlikely than some of the other Tea Party triumphs around the country. Christine O'Donnell also represents a real problem for the Republican party. I mean, her track record of statements, extremist statements and some views on issues are going to be a real problem - not just in a state like Delaware that's more moderate, but it would be the case almost anywhere. That's why you've seen the likes of Karl Rove come out and say that this is a problem for the party. Even if he's behind her or he thinks she can rehabilitate herself, the reality is that she makes it so much more difficult for Republicans to make a pick up there in that Senate race in Delaware. And that's the larger issue, which is, is the Tea Party moving the party in a direction of narrow gains but more widespread losses when it comes to general elections?

HOLT: And how do Democrats (INAUDIBLE)? How does the President and Democrats look at this, maybe borrow something with a playbook? What's the thinking?

GREGORY: Look, on the one hand, it hurts Democrats in the fall because there's so much energy and enthusiasm on the Republican side. Conservatives are going to come out to vote. Democrats, liberals, that base of support that voted for Obama in '08 doesn't necessarily come out in those kinds of numbers for the midterm race. Beyond that, you'll see the President and his allies saying, "Look, this is a Republican party going through a revolution. They don't know which side is up. There's a kind of warlord-ism going on within the party, extremism within the party. This is not a party that you want to have leading the country." That will be the argument that you hear more and more, and that you're already hearing the President make.

-Brad Wilmouth is a news analyst at the Media Research Center.