Celebrates Androgynous Japanese Ad

Cheers ‘changing way gender is portrayed in advertising.’

If there’s any remaining doubt that the left-wing media have little but contempt for traditional Americans, it ain’t the fault of Salon’s Mary Elizabeth Williams.

In an August 26 piece fittingly reposted at the far-left moon-bat site Alter-Net, Williams lovingly described a Japanese Toyota ad featuring an androgynous model while getting in a shot at America.

“[T]he long-haired 19-year-old Ukrainian Stav Strashko struts toward a car as the camera lovingly follows the model’s perfect, red bikini-bottomed butt,” Williams wrote. “A jacket is seductively shed. And then Strashko turns around to reveal – she’s a man, baby! Yup, that bare chest is flat, but the bulge in the bikini bottom is not.”

Sound creepy? Not to Williams. This, she wrote, is “the changing way gender is portrayed in advertising.” The model “represents a new understanding that gender isn’t always neatly defined, and that if a man can be alluringly beautiful, that shouldn’t be anything to be laughed at or scared of.”

Unfortunately, we Americans aren’t sophisticated enough to appreciate what Williams asserted was “definitely an idea worth sharing.”

“Why is the ad not running in America?” she asked. “No doubt because it would immediately gay indoctrinate all our menfolk and then there would never be any more babies made and Mitt Romney would never become president.”

That, of course, is exactly the mocking nastiness that greets any conservative critique of the “queering” of mass culture. In 2011, the Culture and Media Institute caused a media firestorm by pointing out that clothing manufacturer J.Crew’s marketing materials featuring the company president painting her young son’s toenails hot pink was a nod to the gay agenda.

That agenda is advancing. No TV show is complete these days without a gay character or storyline. Gay activist group GLAAD is in a committed relationship with CNN. GM recently began its own campaign marketing to American gays. But it’s probably not aggressive enough for Williams, as she exclaimed to Salon readers, “We still have work to be done, people.”