Appearance Alert!
MRC's Brent Bozell on FNC's The Kelly File, Wednesday 9pm ET/PT

NYTimes Religion Reporter Rhapsodizes Over Singing Lefty Nun, Versus Vatican's 'Harsh Assessment'

New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein was predictably rhapsodic in her profile of the left-wing nun and amateur songstress Kathy Sherman's response to the Vatican's "harsh assessment" of a group of liberal American nuns regarding Catholic doctrine, in Sunday's "Nun Uses Music to Convey Spirited Message Against the Vatican's Rebuke." Goodstein didn't mention the left-wing ideology of The Leadership Conference of Women Religious, which had challenged the church's teaching on homosexuality and the ban on women priests.

When Kathy Sherman was in college during the final years of the Vietnam War, she played the guitar with friends in her dorm room and sang folk and protest songs over bowls of popcorn. They sang Peter, Paul and Mary and Joan Baez, and some friends said her voice reminded them of Judy Collins.

Ms. Sherman graduated and joined an order of Roman Catholic nuns, the Sisters of St. Joseph of La Grange, but she never stopped making music. Last spring, when the Vatican issued a harsh assessment of the group representing a majority of American nuns accusing them of “serious doctrinal problems,” Sister Sherman, 60, said she responded the way she always does when she feels something deeply. She wrote a song.

The words popped into her head two days after the Vatican’s condemnation, as she was walking down the hallway in her order’s ministry center, feeling hurt and angry: “Love cannot be silenced,” she thought. “It never has. It never will.” She went into the center’s dining room and tried out the lyrics on some of her sisters. They liked the message.

“Love Cannot be Silenced” became an anthem, not just for the nuns but also for laypeople who turned out for vigils in front of churches and cathedrals across the country this year to support them. In a voice sweet and resolute, Sister Sherman sang, “We are faithful, loving and wise, dancing along side by side, with a Gospel vision to lead us and Holy Fire in our eyes” -- a lyric that evokes the nuns’ novel forging of spirit with steel.

An accompanying audio clip (really?) of Sherman talking and singing suggests Sherman doesn't have much use for traditional Christian theology, as she speaks of making the idea of God accessible, "whether we call it love or oneness or source or whatever, that doesn't really matter."

Her studio is a refuge, a long room dominated by a black Young Chang piano (a Steinway was out of reach). There is a prayer plant, a picture of her mother, who taught piano, and a plaque that says “It’s a Wonderful Life.” Her long fingers on the keys, she played pieces she wrote at pivotal moments: the start of the Iraq war; the murder of a nun, by an ex-convict, in a Buffalo halfway house she ran; the height of the political vitriol in the last presidential election, in a song she titled “This Is the America I Believe In.”

“A lot of the music I write is not religious, per se,” she said. “It’s got religious values, it’s got spiritual values. The songs may not name God, but they may name the hope, the peace, the love. For me, they are all names for God.”