Appearance Alert!
MRC's Brent Bozell on FNC's Hannity, 10:40pm ET/PT Wednesday

Networks Fuel Cancer Fright with Food Terror

     CBS’s “Evening News” October 31 and CNN’s “American Morning” November 1 decided to enjoy some of the Halloween spirit by scaring viewers with a “landmark” study finding consumption of processed meat could increase the risk of colon cancer.

     CBS’s “Evening News” October 31 and CNN’s “American Morning” November 1 decided to enjoy some of the Halloween spirit by scaring viewers with a “landmark” study finding consumption of processed meat could increase the risk of colon cancer.

 

     CBS anchor Katie Couric made up her mind after the “frightening” news saying, “No more bacon for me,” and CNN’s Kiran Chetry found the news of the findings “very shocking” and noted that “I’m in real trouble here” because of her own eating habits.


     Chetry went even further, “I guess what is so astounding is if they can extrapolate … that it really does cause that much of a jump in risk it should come with a warning label you know just like cigarettes or alcohol does. That’s what seems to be so surprising.”

 

     She later warned her co-host John Roberts to ditch the bacon and to “get rid of it, just hard boiled eggs or Raisin Bran.”

 

     Medical Correspondent for CNN Elizabeth Cohen at least allowed business its say noting, “The meat industry calls this, ‘Extreme, unfounded and irresponsible.’”

 

     Cohen also said that it was possible to find experts not affiliated with the meat industry that would say, “not to eat processed meats at all is going a little overboard.”

 

     “This report is suggesting moderation, not total deprivation,” added Dr. John LaPook of CBS.

 

     The November 1 USA Today story about the report agreed. It featured Karen Collins, a cancer institute nutrition adviser who urged some caution, but not a complete ban on processed meats. “This is a wake-up call for people who eat hot dogs or pepperoni pizza regularly. They need to be looking for other alternatives. But you can still occasionally have a hot dog,” she said.

 

     That article, written by Nanci Hellmich, also had a few more business viewpoints to share on the study.

     In response to the study, Mary Young of the National Cattlemen's Beef Association said the group had “engaged scientists to review the scientific literature on the topic, and they concluded there is no evidence red meat causes cancer.”

     Ceci Snyder, a registered dietitian with the National Pork Board, said, “The U.S. Dietary Guidelines include meat and processed meat, and those guidelines are based on a review of the scientific evidence.”

     The Center for Consumer Freedom said this was just part of a campaign against food. “Bottom line: Anything that tastes good must be bad,” the group said, pointing out that the researchers, “downplayed, the fact that traditional ‘health’ foods like fruits and [vegetables] don’t necessarily prevent cancer as previously believed.”

     “Menu warning labels and other food cop regulations aren’t bolstered by actual empirical evidence, but by speculation and focus groups,” said the article.